Mirchi: A Telugu Movie About Which I Had Rather A Lot To Say!

I was just searching through my email for something else, and I ran across the many many many things I had to say after I watched Mirchi for the first time last year.  Mirchi was my first “real” Telugu movie, not counting Bahubaali.  And I loved it, and it also inspired many many thoughts in my head.  So, since it is a lazy summer weekend, I am going to be lazy and just copy my emails, and split my thoughts into 2 posts over today and tomorrow.

I have so very many thoughts about this, I think I am going to have to just go through it scene by scene, to make sure I don’t forget anything.

So, the first two minutes, with the keytar band on the streets of Milan, Italy, was so wonderfully, not quite dorky, but like surreal?  Like surreally dorky?  But in an aware way?  Anyway, I made my sister watch it, and she loved it so much she almost got sucked into watching the rest of the movie, and then decided to send it off to everyone she knew and our parents.  He’s playing a keytar!  In an alley!  With a multicultural English speaking band including a full drum set!  In an alley!  In Milan!

And then the motorcycle gang shows up, and I think there was a thing about Hindi versus Telugu there.  Because the head of the gang had to translate for the others or something?  Which I find so interesting, because of course in a Hindi movie, everyone in the world just speaks Hindi, including white British muggers (as seen in Ra.One).  But in this Telugu movie, Telugu is more sort of a secret code type thing, there are plenty of people who speak it, but they are surrounded by others who do not.

(Ra.One: the movie that proved the Hindi industry could be just as strange as any regional industry)

And then there is the weird imagined fight scene/fight scene, when our hero describes what he would do to the bad guys, and we see it happen onscreen.  Which was kind of a brilliant work around for having a pacifist hero but still needing to show a fight in the first five minutes.  And then Richa Gangopadhyay (Hey!  She got her MBA from Washington University!  That’s right by where my grandmother used to live!) is walking with her friends and telling them about this cool guy who rescued her last night (again, they all speak Telugu, but they are also clearly from Andhra Pradesh, not like in Hindi movies where you might have the same group and one of them is some random white girl who also apparently understands Hindi).  And as they walk, they keep bumping into Prabhas.  And I think time is supposed to be passing?  But she always wears the same dress.  So either it is a joke about how little time is actually passing, and the title in Telugu that I can’t read just says, like, “five minutes later”, or else it is poor production values.  Because I think he actually changes clothes in this sequence.

Anyway, his whole scam at her with how he “just stopped by campus” “Surprised you in your weird huge Italian apartment that maybe you share with all the other Telugu girls” type thing, having been spoiled already, I was watching closely.  And the thing is, he never actually says anything about being in love with Richa, but he acts in this shy and embarrassed way, so everything he is saying is clearly to hide his deep feelings.  Or at least, that’s what he wants her to think.  Got me all mad at him!

But on the other hand, skipping ahead a bit, when he finally tells her the truth, he says “you never knew the real me” or something like that, which is true!  She knew right from the start that he was faking every interaction, she just thought it was because he was trying to be cool.  But even so, she still shouldn’t have fallen in love with someone who was never really real with her.  Their whole relationship was based on her teasing him because she liked watching him “pretend” not to care.  Which actually reminds me of Jaane Tu…Ya Jaane Na!  As does the pacifist hero thing!  Remember how his romance with not-Genelia looked great to begin with, but then after he met her parents, he realized the whole thing was based on a fantasy, and she spent her whole life pretending everything was fine?  And they didn’t actually know how to be really real with each other?

So then there was the boring party song.  I don’t think it’s just that the Irrfan Khan AIB video has ruined party songs for me, I think this one was legitimately kind of boring to both listen to and watch.

And then they had the “Love!  Love love love” conversation.  Again, jumping ahead a little, he seemed legitimately upset when she talked about how miserable she was at home, which tracks with his later revelation that he didn’t know who she was, and then he was surprised to realize she was sad also.  But he didn’t seem to have much of a reaction to her hometown (although that could be because the subtitles didn’t match the spoken words exactly so the reaction came sooner or later than I was looking for), and also, if he didn’t know who she was until then, why was he being all super flirty and pursuing her?  It makes no sense!!!  Unless he just sensed she was sad and decided to force his way into her life to make her happy although he wasn’t in love with her, and then later found out she was sad and part of his enemies household?  Or else he really did have kind of a crush on a hot girl, even though he was supposed to be in love with the girl back home, but then he would be a jerk.

Anyway, then we are back in Hyderabad and everyone speaks Telugu and we don’t have to bend over backward explaining why.  And we meet the jerky brother (who is also kind of hot) and the hero infiltrates their gang.  And we meet the landlord and his sister-in-law, and that was weird!  First, the house was distinctly less furnished and designed then the same set in a Hindi film would have been.  It’s just these little things where I noticed the money difference between the two industries.  The songs, film quality, costumes, acting, hair make-up etc. was all the exact same quality, and the fight scenes were much better, but every once in a while there would be these little hints that they had slightly less budget to work with than I am used to.  Another sign, in a Hindi film, they actually would have filmed on location in Milan instead of just used a standard establishing shot and clearly being on Indian sound stages for everything else.

Also, the landlord was such an odd comic relief to throw into the middle of this otherwise fairly serious action movie.  It’s all drama and feuding, and then here’s like a Mr. Furly type breaking the fourth wall and stuff.  Also, his sister-in-law was odd.  I kind of liked the idea that she had a crush on the evil brother and our hero just helped her achieve it and thereby “cure” the brother of his violence.  But the whole thing with the landlord being all trying to control her sexuality was creepy.

Also, what is with this director and lady’s toes?  Or maybe it’s an Indian thing (like wet hair) that I didn’t know about?  The sister-in-law is trying to entice the brother by painting her toes outside?  And the landlord freaks out like she’s wearing a bikini or something and forces her back inside the house?  And then later, during the awesome second half love song, our hero paints the heroine’s toes?  I mean, I get it in a general sense, “oo, touching a part of her body!  And sort of hygiene in a sexy way!” but it seemed a little odd to have it in there twice.

And then they go to the club, and I honestly thought there was going to be some sort of joke about how dorky our hero was dancing at (I thought the same when they go to a club in the second half), but no, I guess that’s just how Prabhas dances.  My love is dead.

And then part of the big “love love love!” change in the evil brother is that he starts dressing more modern.  Which I thought was hilarious!  It’s like, just putting on an ultra hipster t-shirt hoodie will make all your anger and testosterone go away.

And then the whole “come to my house!” invitation from the brother, and it turns out this was all a scam to get him in with Richa’s family, which really was just like in DDLJ.  I don’t understand how the landlord ended up there also really, but that just fits with the whole landlord not fitting with the rest of the film problem.  It was the only really poorly plotted and tracked part of it.

Brahmi 2009.png(This guy.  Who supposedly holds the world’s record for most number of films acted in)

And then, bam!  Violence!  Right away, the first time the camera takes us to Richa’s home.  I like that the first violence we see, just the slitting of the throats of the captives, is so blatant and graphic.  It’s a clear tone shift, throwing you right into it.  Also, general interesting thing, depending on the era of film and the location of the industry, films either have the villages as the safe haven from violence (like in Roja) and bad things happening once you go away from them, or else villages as the center of violence, and bad things happen once you return to them (like in this film).  It’s a different kind of violence, too.  The violence in the urban non-village areas tends to be anonymous and uncaring.  The village violence is intimate, almost.  Very much what is shown here, grabbing a guy and looking in his eyes while you slit his throat.

So I just double-checked, and I remembered right, we don’t see Richa or know she is there until her brother arrives.  Which of course heightens the surprise, but also keeps the focus tightly on the household as a whole and the general unhappiness, rather than her love story.  If she had come home and moped about, in love with Jai, it would have been different.  And again, Jai never says anything directly about caring for her when they meet for the first time here, which could be because he is playing it cool, but could also be because he doesn’t want to outright lie to her.  I am comparing the interaction, again, with DDLJ.  In DDLJ, there’s the same coy exchange of glances, but when they are alone, there is no artifice.  It is a straight forward “I am here for you and nothing else.”  Which is kind of the best part, that they are in this little bubble of honesty in the midst of her whole family.  Whereas in this, even when they are alone, it is just a flirty conversation about her waist.

This whole thing is mostly from her perspective.  Which didn’t seem that important to me until we got to the second half and the love song was so different, and clearly from both of them.  Plus, it is just about her waist, which is so superficial compared to the second half relationship.  I’m also thinking maybe it was just a general “this girl does not fit into this family/life” kind of situation, rather than her actually falling for Jai.  It’s mentioned later that she forced her parents to let her study abroad, and certainly her super sexy flirting with Jai is not right for a village girl.  So I don’t think they quite made it clear, but it could have been more of a “she never fit in this world, she felt connected to Jai just because he was outside of it” type thing than a “she fell in love with him for him” type thing.

And then there was the whole bit with the widowed mother which, hmm.  On the one hand, nice that they are showing the human cost of this feud between the village leaders, but on the other hand, it is supporting the whole “a woman is nothing without her men” theory, by the way she is demanding her son back.  Maybe have the son ask for his father?  Or an aged father ask for his son?  I liked the general idea of “better to live for the people who are alive than for vengeance for the people who are dead”, but it was a little bit too reliant on the “a woman needs a man super super much!”  But I really, whole-heartedly, liked the resolution of it with the hero explaining why he had the money to send her son away for education come from the village headman instead of him.  At first I thought it was just to save her pride, but then when it went on and they explained that it saved her pride because the village headman is SUPPOSED to be doing things like this, that was the first indication that they were going a little beyond “violence is bad” and more into “what is your responsibility towards your people.”

And I like that he forces the issue not just with the widow, but with the headman as well!  But just doing it and then letting him see how nice it feels when he is treated and acts like a real leader instead of just a thug, it’s a lot simpler than actually trying to get him to do something nice and see the outcome.  Also, man Prabhas must be rich!!!  Enough money to pay for his schooling and set them up in the city, and he just pulls it out of his pocket to prove a point?

And then there was the bit with both Richa’s marriage and the village girl who wanted to go to school.  I think with the village girl, but I’m not sure because it would have been in the dialogue and not in the subtitles, and I don’t understand Telugu, I think there was a caste issue as well? So when the headman decides to help her, he is not just helping a girl, but someone lower cast, get education because she is “his” person and he has a responsibility to her.  And it also means that she didn’t just need his permission to go to school, she needed his active assistance and involvement.  Basically, he wasn’t a “bad” village headman before, he just wasn’t a truly great one who went the extra mile and earned the love of his followers.

With Richa’s marriage, again, they towed the line of the family not being really “bad”, but just not super super good.  They asked her mother’s opinion and followed it, they were looking for a nice handsome young boy (not just selling her off to anyone), and when her mother was convinced by reasoned arguments based on her daughter’s happiness, she had no fear to speak her piece.  Would have been a lot better if all that was needed was Richa saying she didn’t want it, but that’s never going to happen in an Indian movie!

And then there was a bit after it that makes no sense with the future revelations!  Richa kisses Prabhas on the cheek and he smiles and is all happy when no one is looking.  Why?  Why would you do that if you don’t care about her?  Is getting a kiss on the cheek, from anybody, just that great?  The only other reason would be that the comic relief guy is watching and thinks he has figured out that they are in love, so he is putting it on for the comic relief?  But why would he care what he thinks?

So then he saves the “Evil” uncle from the other villagers.  And half jokingly suggests that Richa’s family just doesn’t do anything in retaliation for like 50 years, and then nothing would happen, since it is now “their turn”.  Which was actually one of my favorite bits.  But the uncle decides instead to hire goons from “Bihar” to ambush and massacre his family.  And then there is the awesome fight sequence.

So two things I noticed about why the excused his intervention here, even though our hero is a “pacifist”.  First, they were both sort of “non-combatants” on both sides.  On the one hand, the “evil” family wasn’t using their loyal villagers avenging a series of deaths from their side, they were using machetes-for-hire from outside, which is breaking the rules, and it means the machetes-for-hire don’t count as much.  They won’t be starting another stream of revenge, and they are truly terrible people who will kill just for money.  And then the “good” family didn’t have any fighting men with them, it was woman and children being attacked.  So our hero getting involved at this point is also a little bit outside of the rule books, but that’s okay.  He is protecting innocents from actual bad guys, it’s not like he is taking sides in a fair fight.

It would have been really cool if they had reversed it somehow, had his side hire people to kill the innocents on the other side, and show that it is really really not about sides, but about right and wrong.  But this was okay too.  Also, the reveal of his machete hidden in the mud and the way he lifts it is when I had the “oh, machetes are swords!” revelation.  He’s not treating it like a work implement that can become a weapon, he is treating it like weapon, with the whole “first time I am touching a machete again!” kind of build up.  And then he kills everybody, and declares his allegiance to the other village (without revealing his face so Richa’s side doesn’t know for sure who this fighter is), and it is all awesome.

With the machetes, I was really impressed with how they were used, more like a sword fight in an old Errol Flynn movie than just brute strength.  There was a lot of clever spinning around and parrying and stuff.  Which, when I was watching Bahubali, I was super impressed with the sword work, both in terms of the actors’ abilities and the fight choreography.  I’m used to, even in American movies, just sort of stupid “clink-clink” type sword fights with no real imagination.  But I guess that’s how machetes work in South Indian films?  As sort of modern day swords?  It made the fight scenes much more interesting.  And, obviously, is why all the stars of Bahubali are able to believably handle medieval weapons.  They make such a big deal about, like, the sword training for Lord of the Rings, and those fight scenes were less imaginative and required a lot less skill than the ones in Bahubali.  Which makes sense, if part of being a Southern star is sophisticated machete fight training.

And that’s the entire first half of the movie!  Phew!  And since I am being lazy, I will come back tomorrow for the second half.

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9 thoughts on “Mirchi: A Telugu Movie About Which I Had Rather A Lot To Say!

  1. Prabhas was ok and there isn’t much of anything else that this movie has to offer, besides extreme close-ups of Richa’s waistline. Mirchi lacks narrative power and is loosely based on amalgamation of many old movies which make it predictable

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  2. Pingback: Mirchi Part 2: I Still Have So Much More to Say! | dontcallitbollywood

  3. Pingback: My Movie To-Do List: Let Me Know If I Missed Something! And Click the Links to See What I Have Already Covered! | dontcallitbollywood

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  5. So here I am, steadily working my way through all your even-vaguely-related-to-BB-and-Prabhas posts. 😛 Sorry for all the comment spam, but when I saw that this review had hardly any comments, I couldn’t stop myself.

    Before I comment – I will admit that I have only seen the first half of Mirchi once, back when I first saw it on tv. I almost always end up watching the second half whenever it is on tv, because of the Jai/Vennela plot and the Prabhas/Anushka chemistry – and the Idedo song, which I love, and the <Darlingey song, which always makes me laugh. 😛

    I don’t recall too well, but my impression was always that in the first half (chronologically the second half), Jai was aimless and at loose ends – his mother is dead, he is in exile and his love/fiancee is back home) and latched onto Manasa as a “project” or “cause” – although I hate the idea of a person being a project – I always interpreted all the Jai-Manasa interaction as Jai trying to distract himself by “fixing” Manasa’s life. It could also be that he felt a sense of responsibility to make sure she was alright, given that he saved her from the motorbike gang in the beginning.

    Although, with my headcanon of an aimless Jai in Milan, him joining a random band and playing in an alley makes zero sense, so I am putting that down to most directors needing to give their “heroes” a suitably “heroic” and cool introductory scene, because to me, it makes no sense any other way.

    Similarly, I think Jai’s reaction to Manasa’s kiss was a directorial trick meant to make us think Jai has feelings for her – which I felt was a bit of a cheap attempt at a shocking twist when Jai reveals his past. Because you’re right, it made no sense for Jai to react that way if he really loved someone else all along – and was in a long distance relationship with her!

    Also, his sister-in-law was odd. I kind of liked the idea that she had a crush on the evil brother and our hero just helped her achieve it and thereby “cure” the brother of his violence. But the whole thing with the landlord being all trying to control her sexuality was creepy.

    I always thought the landlord’s interaction with his sister-in-law was a creepy way of showing he was interested in having a thing “on the side” with her. It’s not explicit in the movie, but the actor is kind of known for doing roles where he has/is always looking to have a second wife. It’s one of those very “cultural” fetishes – the young, attractive sister-in-law who is “ripe for the taking” to use a disgusting term for it! There’s even a saying in Hindi which translates to something like, “the wife’s sister is a half-wife”. :/

    So! I always thought this was why the landlord was so weird about Poorna’s relationship with his sister-in-law. Or else we can just chalk it up to him not wanting a jerky, ultra aggressive guy from a regressive, violent family as a husband to his sister-in-law.

    (On a tangent – there’s this bit when Poorna’s on the phone to his girlffriend and the landlord asks P to hang up because he wants to speak to his wife – and P goes “Annayya (brother) says ‘hi!'” which is doubly funny because P is behaving like he is already married into the family – spouses to a pair of siblings are considered to be siblings themselves – it’s where the uniquely Indian term “co-brother” or “co-sister” comes from. 😉

    Which of course heightens the surprise, but also keeps the focus tightly on the household as a whole and the general unhappiness, rather than her love story. If she had come home and moped about, in love with Jai, it would have been different. And again, Jai never says anything directly about caring for her when they meet for the first time here, which could be because he is playing it cool, but could also be because he doesn’t want to outright lie to her.

    I noticed how Jai lies by omission when he doesn’t tell Manasa he is NOT interested – because come on, all that flirting in the fields and he didn’t know she liked him?

    However, I had never noticed how Manasa doesn’t have any of those typical “love story” moments when she is separated from Jai, meaning that she is a flase romantic lead. Good catch!

    I think with the village girl, but I’m not sure because it would have been in the dialogue and not in the subtitles, and I don’t understand Telugu, I think there was a caste issue as well?

    As I recall, it was a classist issue? I think the girl was either from a family of farm labourers (who worked specifically on the headman’s farm) or that her mother was domestic help. I remember the headman saying something like: “A life of servitude was good enough for your mother, why can’t you do the same? Come to work tomorrow morning onwards!”

    And it also means that she didn’t just need his permission to go to school, she needed his active assistance and involvement.

    THIS. The headman basically bullies the college management into letting the girl study there for free – the principal tells him that all such “free”/charitable seats have been filled already, and all they have left are seats that require extra payment.

    The headman responds by shaming him and bullying him into accepting the girl as a student – and teling him there would be more next year! He says something like, “I can pay for her education myself, but then I would be the only ‘good’ person around here – this is your opportunity to do some good by giving her a seat!”

    Which I found a little hypocritically funny, given how Jai had to influence the headman into helping out the girl, but then I guess what goes around comes around? 😛

    And then there was a bit after it that makes no sense with the future revelations! Richa kisses Prabhas on the cheek and he smiles and is all happy when no one is looking. Why?

    This was a scene that really annoyed me! I think it was just way to make the twist all the more shocking, when it finally comes.

    But I guess that’s how machetes work in South Indian films? As sort of modern day swords? It made the fight scenes much more interesting.

    Funny – when you’re immersed in a culture, you never really realise how unusual some things are to others! I guess a lot people who grow up in urban South India have seen a machete at least once in their lives – we have people selling coconuts on the streets, here, during summers – and the sellers always use machetes to lop off the tops of coconuts. So machetes are a bit of an everyday thing – sort of like an all purpose tool that can also be used as a weapon. And a lot of South Indian movies have action sequences that use machetes.

    I guess it also ties into the “homemade weapon” thing – regions of AP and Telangana once had a lot of “factionism” – real life versions of the family feud in Mirchi – with the weapons of choice used to eliminate rivals being homemade bombs and explosives and other weapons at hand – such as machetes and homemade guns.

    So a lot of South Indian film villains who are coded as “factionists” – think guys in white who alight from white SUVs, like Manasa’s prospective groom, who Jai objects to – have henchman who wave machetes from the windows of their own SUVs during fight scenes.

    And, obviously, is why all the stars of Bahubali are able to believably handle medieval weapons. They make such a big deal about, like, the sword training for Lord of the Rings, and those fight scenes were less imaginative and required a lot less skill than the ones in Bahubali. Which makes sense, if part of being a Southern star is sophisticated machete fight training.

    Haha, I did not think of this! 😛 Interesting!

    Now, off to read part two of your review and comment there! My favourite part is up – Jai/Vennela aka Prabhas/Anushka! 😀

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    • (OMG was it busy at work today! I spent the last three hours thinking “phone, stop ringing! I have to respond to SS Kuruganti’s comment!” Anyway, now I am home, I have my lemonade, I can really answer”)

      First, there is no comment spam! I love comments! Especially on posts that don’t have any yet. Any time a comment goes up, more people go look at the post who wouldn’t see it otherwise. And if you are working through BB/Prabhas posts, make sure to check out Rudhramadevi, Maya Bazaar, Bujjigaddu. Oh, and Billu, which was TERRIBLE.

      I went with the idea that Jai was looking for Mannala, possibly. Two random people both ending up in Milan seems like a pretty big coincidence. If his plan was to bring peace through love, than the first step would be to find the weak link the in the family, and the young woman studying overseas seems like a pretty good bet. And he goes straight from there to the other younger person in the family. Then the women in the family, then the more reasonable old men, and then finally the real stick-in-the-mud. Heck, the way he approaches Subbaraju is pretty much the same as how he approaches Mannala! So why not have a similar kind of plan? Go to the place, wait for a meeting, worm his way into her confidence, win her over with “love”. It also makes a lot more sense to me that he would react to his life falling apart by coming up with a plan and tringy to solve this problem, instead of taking off for Milan with his keytar. Plus, remember that architecture firm? Which he is constantly taking long leaves from? I would hope that he wouldn’t just up and go to Milan, leaving them all alone, for no reason.

      I think I heard the “sister-in-law is half a wife” line before! In HAHK maybe? But I hadn’t heard the “co-brother” “co-sister” before, that’s neat! Now I want to apply it to my own family, but I don’t think we have anybody in that situation. Oh, unless we count my father’s cousin as his “cousin-brother”! In which case my mother definitely is “co-sister” with his wife.

      Really now, that I am thinking about it, what makes the most sense is that Prabhas really was trying to make Mannalla fall in love with him! Just like he made Subbaraju fall in love to soften him. He doesn’t actually cross the line with her, but he sure lets her build up one heck of a crush without really trying to stop it!

      I loved how the headman turned good by actively trying to improve the life of the lowest of his protectorate! A woman, a young unmarried low class woman. It’s just so awesomely socialist and progressive and all that! this is one thing that the southern films DEFINITELY do better than the northern films. Which is strange, because they can also be way more misogynistic in specific cases. But then they will pull out these great examples of systemic patriarchy.

      Maybe the director didn’t know for sure which way he was going? I mean, a lot of those scenes in the first half feel like he thought this was going to be the end-all be-all romance. Maybe he changed the script after filming started? Or else he is just a mean mean man and was trying to trick us.

      Is “factionism” the same as “land disputes” in north India? that’s another phrase that brings to mind lawyers and surveyors and stuff, and then you find out it really means knives and murders.

      anyway, for machetes, in America it would be baseball bats. Or guns I guess. But baseball bats would be more the “literally everyone has one”. I mean, I have one! Not that I ever plan to use it in a violent way (or a baseball playing way), but it’s my grandfather was getting rid of his at the same time I moved into my first apartment, and I grabbed it and keep it by the front door. And when you hear about random spontaneous beatdowns, baseball bats are common. Or if, I don’t know, you hear a sound downstairs and go to investigate, you would grab your bat. But I don’t look at a baseball bat and immediately think “violent weapon!” Which is I think what you are saying about machetes, they could be used that way, but everyone has one, and there are plenty of other uses too.

      On Wed, Jun 21, 2017 at 3:07 PM, dontcallitbollywood wrote:

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      • I would hope that he wouldn’t just up and go to Milan, leaving them all alone, for no reason.

        Your theory makes a lot more sense, so yes, I shall be going with this. 😛

        Is “factionism” the same as “land disputes” in north India? that’s another phrase that brings to mind lawyers and surveyors and stuff, and then you find out it really means knives and murders.

        Pretty much! It’s like the Montagues and Capulets, but without any Romeos or Juliets. It’s more specific to a particular region in Andhra Pradesh called Rayalaseema.

        The disuptes were usually between two families (all the way along all their extensions/branches) with the fight being for the rights to fertile land or mineral ores, etc. One side would start smuggling stuff out, another would kill the people involved, and on it went. It eventually spread to politicial rivalries, as well. A lot of homemade bombs and farming implements being used to kill. And it was a generational rivalry! Scary stuff.

        Not sure if you’ve seen Ram Gopal Verma’s Rakta Charitra movies, but they are based on the lives of two famous factionists who went on to become politicians.

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        • The factionism stuff is really interesting. So it could be less that Telugu films are violent and crazy just because it’s fun, and more because there was real life stuff available to support the violent/crazy/

          Although of course the same is true in other areas of the country too. I did some quick background reading after seeing Dangal, in “real life”, Aamir Khan’s character raised his 4 daughters, plus two nieces, because his brother was killed in a “land dispute” leaving them orphans.

          On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 9:10 AM, dontcallitbollywood wrote:

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